Tag Archives: Greenpeace

Greenpeace puts out list of Non-GMO food companies

If you are looking for a list of Non-GMO/GE food companies, and a list of those companies that do use GM, Greenpeace has compiled a list you can print out and take to the grocery store. Thanks Greenpeace.

I have some additions to the good companies that don’t use GM. You can find them under the “Foods” page on this blog. I will be adding to them as I find them. I source them out by calling and speaking with their researchers and owners. I only post companies that are 100% Non-GE.

Greenpeace: Shopper’s Guide to Avoid Genetically Engineered Foods

You have a right to know.

Response to Western Producer newspaper: Greenpeace responsible for Triffid flax scandal

By April Reeves

I responded to this article in the ‘editorial’ on their Nov. 26/09 publication. It was written by 5 people. I wonder if the Producer is writing ‘nice’ things about Monsanto in order to continue their advertising. I owned a publication once; I know what that’s all about…

GM Acceptance/Opponents Fading

Positive signs for greater acceptance of GM foods, by Bruce Dyck, Terry Fries, Barb Glen, D’Arce Mcmillan and Ken Zacharias

GREENPEACE’S European campaign against genetically modified crops has hurt Canadian farmers. The organization pressured European authorities to test Canadian flax for the presence of unauthorized genetically altered seed and pressured mustard processors to avoid Canadian mustard seed.

Greenpeace got what it wanted in the Triffid flax situation, a trumped up “scandal” to rail against, to frighten consumers about the alleged dangers of GM crops and inadequate government regulation and oversight.

Canadian farmers got what they didn’t want, market disruption, lower prices and a costly new flax testing system.

But they might take hope in signs that European obstacles to trade in GM crops are eroding and Greenpeace’s anti-GM campaign will eventually fail.

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Bayer Admits GMO Contamination is Out of Control

Greenpeace International, Dec 8, 2009

EXTRACT: Bayer has admitted it has been unable to control the spread of its genetically-engineered organisms despite ‘the best practices [to stop contamination]'(1). It shows that all outdoors field trials or commercial growing of GE crops must be stopped before our crops are irreversibly contaminated.

$2 million US dollar verdict against Bayer confirms company’s liability for an uncontrollable technology

Greenpeace welcomes the United States federal jury ruling on 4 December 2009 that Bayer CropScience LP must pay $2 million US dollars to two Missouri farmers after their rice crop was contaminated with an experimental variety of rice that the company was testing in 2006.

This verdict confirms that the responsibility for the consequences of GE (genetic engineering) contamination rests with the company that releases GE crops.
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Review of documentary ‘Monsanto Expose’

Millions Against MonsantoMonsanto Exposé

Review of the documentary “The World According to Monsanto: From dioxin to genetically modified crops. A multinational with your best interests at heart.” A film by Marie-Monique Robin.

This film is a hard hitting look at Monsanto’s history and origins in the chemical industry through its transformation into a biotech agricultural company and, particularly relevant for this website, its efforts to stamp out traditional seeds and replace them with patented genetically engineered seeds. It is a must see for anybody concerned about preserving our seed heritage and for anybody concerned about the general issue of food security.

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Biotech Companies Walk out on Food Project

Corn bomb - genetic engineering of plants and animals is still untested long termwww.guardian.co.uk

Biotechnology companies developing genetically modified crops have withdrawn from a major international project to map out the future of agriculture, after it failed to back GM as a tool to reduce poverty and hunger.

The International Assessment of Agricultural Science and Technology for Development aims to focus attention on the problem of how to feed the world’s growing population, as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has done for the challenge of global warming. Monsanto, Syngenta and BASF resigned after a draft report from the project highlighted the risks of GM crops and said they could pose problems for the developing world.

The companies argue the report should say their GM technology could secure future food supplies because it can boost yields and make plants more resistant to droughts and higher temperatures.

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